2 Old Hippies

The US 2 East Adventure Part 1: BTV to Palmyra, Maine

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US 2 East, Burlington, Vermont to Palmyra Maine.

Before peak foliage, there is peak green.

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US 2 east took us from Burlington along the Winooski River through Montpelier, Plainfield and Marshfield, where we parted ways with the river, and continued east to Danville, St Johnsbury and across the Connecticut River. Stopping for the first view of the Presidential Range outside of Danville took almost as long as driving across the narrow neck of New Hampshire.

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“This car did not climb Mt Washington,” but I did take a selfie as we flew past. (I will spare you my photo of Santa’s Village.)

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Our first night was in Palmyra, Maine. My paternal great-grandfather, George Millett, was born here in the mid-19th century, and there are still some Milletts living here, and plenty more resting here in the bosom of Abraham. George’s daughter Maude, my grandmother, was born in Wisconsin as George followed the timber harvesting business across the continent. They ended up in Libby Montana where Maude and Frederick Keller brought forth my father, Millett Frederick Keller. Who grew up on US 2, which runs through Libby. Really, it does.

So, back to Palmyra. I visited the newer  Millett place, which sits right on US 2. I took this photo at 6AM as we left town, and no one was up yet. We’ll visit on the flip side of the trip. I visited Palmyra back in the early 1980s, and the building on the left was the General Store, Millett’s by name, and the proprietor, one George Millett, took me to visit the cemetery. I figured him to be a second or third cousin, and e didn’t know he was named after his great (perhaps two greats?) uncle. The store is now closed, and last week I saw his obit in an online local newspaper as I was planning this trip.

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There are more Milletts resting a couple miles off US 2. Herewith, for the genealogists in my family, are some photos.

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Thomas, on the left, is my great-grandfather George’s father, who moved to Palmyra from Leeds, MA. His father Thomas was the reason Maude (and me and my sisters and nieces and great-nieces for that matter) are eligible for the Daughters of the American Revolution. (I toyed in the 1990s with the idea of taking over the local chapter and making it truly revolutionary again. May revisit that idea…)

If my father knew that his great-uncle Francis brought a Japanese bride back from WWII, he sure didn’t tell us about it….

A lovely supper at our camping spot at the Palmyra Golf Resort and Campground. End of Day one.

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7 thoughts on “The US 2 East Adventure Part 1: BTV to Palmyra, Maine

  1. “If my father knew that his great-uncle Francis brought a Japanese bride back from WWII, he sure didn’t tell us about it….”?? Sounds like there must have been a time warp.

  2. The headstone says Francis was born in 1926 so he was 10 years younger than dad. And to be his uncle he would have to be Maude’s brother and she was an only child. I’m thinking he was a distant cousin.

  3. Francis D. Millett, was the son of Francis D. and Gertrude (Littlefield) Millett – who was the son of Sewall B. and Edith (Turnbush) Millett. Sewall was the son of Thomas Millett whose headstone is pictured. This makes the Francis D. Millett who married Kuniko, your second counsin x1 removed.

  4. What happened to the rest of the trip? Last thing I heard you were headed to the ferry to Grand Manan.

    • Paul: Life intervened, and I underwent the punishment that follows taking a break from work. A pileup, in other words. I hope to carry on with 3-4 more posts about the trip this week. Thanks for your interest!

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